Elizabeta Briski, PhD

Büro:
Tel.: 0431 600 1589
Fax: 0431 600 4402
Raum: 034
E-Mail: ebriski(a)geomar.de

Anschrift:
GEOMAR | Helmholtz-Zentrum für Ozeanforschung Kiel
Experimentelle Ökologie I (Nahrungsnetze)
Düsternbrooker Weg 20
24105 Kiel

Persönliche homepage:
elizabetabriski.yolasite.com


 

 

Wissenschaftlicher Werdegang

  • 2014 - current - Sofja Kovalevskaja Junior Research Group Leader, GEOMAR - Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany
  • 2011 - 2014 - NSERC Postdoctoral Fellow, Great Lakes Laboratory for Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Burlington, Ontario, Canada
  • 2011 - 2011 - Postdoctoral Fellow, Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada
  • 2011 - PhD in Environmental Science - Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada - Invasion risk associated with invertebrates and their dormant stages in ships entering Canadian ports.
  • 2006 - 2011 - Research Assistant, Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada
  • 2006 - Master of Science in Aquaculture - Laboratory of Aquaculture and Artemia Reference Center, University of Gent, Gent, Belgium - Laboratory production of early hatching cycts of Artemia sp. by selection
  • 2005 - 2006 - Research Assistant, Laboratory of Aquaculture and Artemia Reference Center, University of Gent, Gent, Belgium

Forschungsinteressen

  • Invasion ecology
  • Vectors of species introduction
  • Community dynamics during transportation of species
  • Life-history traits of non-indigenous taxa
  • Adaptation of species to novel environments

Projekte

  • Determining if species from a particular region (i.e., Ponto-Caspian, Northern Europe or Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River) better tolerate and acclimate to environmental and biological conditions of non-native areas
  • Salinity tolerance of non-indigenous species and transitions of species from marine to brackish and freshwater habitats and vice versa