Human impacts on marine ecosystems

Human activities affect marine ecosystems as a result of pollution, overfishing, the introduction of invasive species,and acidification, which all impact on the marine food web and may lead to largely unknown consequences for the biodiversity and survival of marine life forms.

News for topic: Human impacts on marine ecosystems

Sampling of the fjord surface water with the research vessel POLARFUCHS. Photo: Jens Klimmeck/GEOMAR
28.05.2020

Rainwater flushes microplastics into the Kiel Fjord

First long-term study on microplastic distribution in surface water published

Seagrass meadow in the Baltic Sea. This is not a population, but a clone. Photo Pekka Tuuri Using sea gr
11.05.2020

Clones - everything but identical

New study shows why asexual populations of plants or animals can thrive in nature

An alga of the genus Micromonas, for which the first transformation protocols are presented. Since Micromonas photosynthesizes with the chloroplast (shown here in green) and is very abundant in the ocean, it plays a role in the global carbon cycle. Photo: Tom Deerinck, Mark Ellisman, Alexandra Worden
06.04.2020

Tiny marine organisms as the key to global cycles

New ways to understand the functioning of marine phytoplankton

Using special nets, the team of expedition AL534/2 investigates the microplastic distribution off the coast of Western Europe. Photo: Expedition team AL534/2
30.03.2020

Where is the plastic in the ocean?

GEOMAR coordinates new JPI-Oceans project on the distribution of plastic waste in the ocean

Healthy bladderwrack Fucus vesiculosusis. Photo: Uli Kunz.
15.10.2019

Acceleration and brake processes to adapt to global change

Bladderwrack shows coupled reactions to environmental changes

Scientists recovering the water sampler used to collect ocean samples. Photo: Marie Cuvelier
26.09.2019

Viruses as Modulators of Interactions in Marine Ecosystems

GEOMAR scientists show a new picture of the role of viruses in the ocean

The three-dimensional representation of the sponge tissue illustrates the close contact of sponge cells (red) with the bacteria (turquoise) living in the sponge.. Photo: Martin T. Jahn/GEOMAR
24.09.2019

Symbiosis as a tripartite relationship

Investigation of viral communities of sponges allows new insights into the mechanisms of symbiosis

Red Seaweed of the species Agarophyton vermyculophyllum. Photo: Mahasweta Saha/PML
13.05.2019

Seaweeds can attract friends and keep away enemies

Scientists from Kiel and Plymouth show for the first time health-promoting microbial manipulation in aquatic plants

A barred Hamlet (Hypoplectrus puella) off the coast of Panama. Photo: Kosmas Hench/GEOMAR
04.03.2019

How new species arise in the sea

Study sheds new light on a fundamental question in evolutionary biology

Commercial trawling (left) and catches of elasmobranch (right) outside and inside of protected areas. Graphics: M. Dureuil, Dalhousie Univ.
20.12.2018

Marine Protected Areas not safe

Bottom trawling endangers many species