Ocean and Climate

The oceans play a central role in global change processes.Major aspects of climate change are associated with the ocean’s heat transport, heat capacity, and the global water cycle. However, oceanic storage, transformation, transport and exchange of radiatively and chemically active gases and particles also exert an influence on climate through their impact on atmospheric radiation transfer. Past climate change has had demonstrable influences on the isotopic and chemical composition of seawater, which permits these signals to be investigated as potential recorders of change. Since exchanges of heat and substances between the ocean, land and the atmosphere operate on time scales ranging from seasons to millennia, they are amongst the most important factors for shaping future global climate change.

Research topics under this headline include:

  • Understanding of Past, Present and Future Overturning Circulation Changes
  • Changes in the Tropics
  • Present and Past Arctic Oceanography and Climate
  • Future Greenhouse Warming: Assessment and Scenarios
  • Past Geochemical Change in the Oceans

Further scientific information can be found on the pages of the Research Division 1: Ocean Circulation and Climate Dynamics.

News for research topic: "Ocean and Climate"

The south Atlantic 59 million years ago. Grafik: Graphic: Sietske Batenburg
23.11.2018

How the Atlantic Ocean became Part of the Global Circulation

Scientists discover an important climatic tipping point

The graph shows precipitation (minus evaporation) over the Indian Ocean from June to August. The points mark the places of origin of previously used climate archives. The two points in the Andaman Sea mark the new sediment cores that have been used for the first time. Graphic: Daniel Gebregiorgis
08.11.2018

One million years of precipitation history of the monsoon reconstructed

Sediment cores allow new insights into the mechanisms of this climate phenomenon

Negative emissions that could lead to the 1.5° climate target are still subject to many uncertainties. Graphic: Rita Erven/GEOMAR
11.10.2018

Do we need technical measures for CO2 removal to achieve the 1.5° target?

DFG Priority Programme Publishes Video on the Role of Negative Emissions

Numerous factors - including the sea surface temperature, currents, edddies, biogeochemical processes - influence the oxygen content of the oceans. So far, models do not represent all processes correctly and therefore underestimate the oxygen loss of the oceans. Graphic: Rita Erven/GEOMAR
11.06.2018

Further Drivers of Ocean Deoxygenation identified

GEOMAR oceanographers reveal gaps in previous model calculations

The Irminger Sea seen from the research vessel MARIA S. MERIAN. It is one of the few regions in the world where deep convection occurs. The process is a key component global ocean circulation system. Photo: Arne Bendinger / GEOMAR
13.03.2018

Warm summers could weaken ocean circulation

Long-term observations reveal the influence of increased surface freshening on convection in the subpolar North Atlantic

Bathymetric map of the Nyegga region off the coast of Central Norway. Graphic: Jens Karstens / GEOMAR
12.02.2018

Why did gas hydrates melt at the end of the last ice age?

GEOMAR researchers find links between sedimentation and methane seeps on the seafloor off the coast of Norway

Time series of two observational data sets of sea surface temperature anomalies (HadSST2, without correction and HadSST3, with correction) as well as reconstructed temperatures from corals in the Indian Ocean. From Pfeiffer et al., 2017).
05.12.2017

Corals reveal changes in the measurement technique

Reconstructed temperatures provide information about systematic errors in ship measurements

The Underwater Vision Profiler during a trial in the Kiel Fjord. The UVP provided crucial data for the new study. Photo: Rainer Kiko, GEOMAR
10.10.2017

Marine Snowfall at the Equator

GEOMAR team publishes a detailed picture of the biological particle flow into the deep sea along the equator

Aerial view of a polynya in the Southern Ocean. Photo: Jan Lieser, ACE CRC, Australia
29.09.2017

Antarctica: Return of the Weddell Polynya supports Kiel Climate Model

After 40 years, a large ice-free area appears again in the Southern Ocean in mid-winter

The Cape Verdean research vessel ISLANDIA has been used to take samples from the low-oxygen eddy. Photo: B. Fiedler, GEOMAR
07.07.2017

Extreme low-oxygen Eddies in the Atlantic produce Greenhouse Gases

International research team discovers previously unknown processes in the Atlantic